Internet On Trial

Internet On Trial

Modern Day Litigation, Cyber Defamation, and Law in Sports & Entertainment

Tag Archives: Apple

Is All Your Software and Firmware Up To Date?

Posted in Internet & Media Law, Privacy Law, Technology Law
Do you ignore messages like this? A recent study analyzing the security health of 4.6 million endpoint devices, which included 3.5 million mobile phones across multiple industries and geographic regions revealed that across all devices and operating systems (OS), only about 31% of the devices were running the latest OS version. That means more than two-thirds… Continue Reading

Can Hackers Access Your Data by Copying Your Fingerprints?

Posted in Privacy Law
Unlocking your iPhone using biometrics (“fingerprint”) authentication is undoubtedly convenient, but have you considered the cost—the security tradeoffs you make in exchange for that added convenience? Although privacy and Fourth Amendment laws among the states are still very much in flux, it’s no longer just the police you have to worry about accessing your data. Digital photo technology… Continue Reading

Government “Appeals” Judge Orenstein’s Ruling

Posted in Litigation & Appeals, Privacy Law, Technology Law
The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York (that’s Brooklyn, for everyone in the rest of the world) has filed an “appeal” of Magistrate Judge James Orenstein’s order denying its motion to compel Apple to develop software to bypass the security measures built into iOS to withstand a brute force attack. Why is “appeal”… Continue Reading

How Secure Are Your Text Messages?

Posted in Privacy Law, Technology Law
Over 6 billion text messages are sent in the U.S. every single day. That’s 6,000,000,000. Ninety-seven percent of Americans send at least one text message per day. The average Millennial exchanges 67 texts per day. Text messaging is rapidly becoming the preferred method of communication for many people. But just how private are those messages? Do… Continue Reading

It’s good to own an iPhone—especially if you don’t live in Minnesota

Posted in Privacy Law, Technology Law
While Congress mulls over proposed federal legislation that would require smartphone manufacturers to incorporate a “kill switch” feature in all new devices sold, Minnesota just beat them to punch, becoming the first state to enact such a law. The so-called kill switch is a feature that would allow devices to be completely disabled—remotely—as a way… Continue Reading