Internet On Trial

Internet On Trial

Modern Day Litigation, Cyber Defamation, and Law in Sports & Entertainment

Category Archives: Internet & Media Law

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What is the “single publication rule,” and why should you care?

Posted in Cyber-defamation, Defamation, First Amendment, New Jersey, Ohio
  You’ve probably heard the term statute of limitations before, and you might even know what it is — the time limit for filing a lawsuit, which is established by a state legislature or Congress, and defines the absolute deadline that a suit can be filed after the occurrence of the event that gave rise to the… Continue Reading

Sutton Knocks Another One Out of the Park, Shuts Down $19 Trillion Suit Against Google

Posted in Cyber-defamation, Defamation, Internet & Media Law, Litigation & Appeals
Pro tip: If ever you Google yourself, and are unhappy with the results, don’t sue Google. Why not? Because under a federal law known as the Communications Decency Act, websites and/or services that only republish or display content created by third-parties — i.e. sites that don’t create their own substantive content — are not liable for the substance of… Continue Reading

The Government’s War on Encryption, Backdoors, and What in the World Would Antonin Scalia Do?

Posted in Internet & Media Law, Privacy Law, Technology Law
Earlier this week, the anti-encryption discussion got elevated to a war. No, a federal court judge did not order Apple to crack the encryption on the dead terrorist’s iPhone 5C, though you’d be forgiven if that’s what you heard or believed, since mainstream media outlets as big as NBC are reporting it that way. Thanks to Mike Masnick (@mmasnick) at… Continue Reading

Don’t Become a Statistic: Fight Copyright Trolls Now

Posted in Copyright, Internet & Media Law
Copyright trolls like Malibu Media, Voltage Pictures, Dallas Buyers Club, TCYK, and Manny Film LLC now account for over 40% of all copyright infringement lawsuits in the United States. Over the last half decade, these and other vexatious litigants have devised a scheme to outmaneuver the legal system by exploiting the nexus of antiquated U.S. copyright… Continue Reading

Avvo Ruling Doesn’t Create a Green Light for Anonymous Defamation

Posted in Cyber-defamation, Defamation, First Amendment, Internet & Media Law
People are making much ado about this week’s decision out of a Washington state appellate court surrounding a negative online review on the popular lawyer website Avvo.com. But it’s really much ado about nothing. The Avvo decision didn’t change the law; its chief holding is that people who post to the Internet anonymously can remain anonymous under protections granted… Continue Reading

First Amendment Doesn’t Cover Jokes About Cops

Posted in First Amendment, Internet & Media Law, New Jersey, Social Media Law
The First Amendment is like that unwritten rule about the things you’re not supposed to discuss in a bar — politics and religion — because that’s what it’s really about. This is probably why the government isn’t in the bar business. Because of the First Amendment, the government can’t stop you from supporting the political candidate or issue of your… Continue Reading

World Backup Day: Are YOU Prepared for a Total Data Loss or Breach?

Posted in Internet & Media Law
Today, March 31, 2015, marks the fifth annual World Backup Day. Before you physically step back from wherever you’re standing, that’s not the kind of “backing up” that was intended by the founders of World Backup Day, who were simply a group of concerned Internet users, posting their thoughts and ideas about data security to the international Internet… Continue Reading

California’s “Yelp” Bill Becomes Law

Posted in Cyber-defamation, Defamation, Internet & Media Law, Social Media Law
In this age social media justice, sooner or later you’re going to have an encounter with a negative online review, whether your a business owner, or simply a consumer. It seems like it’s becoming an accepted aspect of our lives. Increasingly, however, consumer reviews posted on various Internet sites are becoming the subject of litigation.… Continue Reading

It’s Time To Change Your Password—YES YOU!

Posted in Email
It’s a good idea to check your spam/junk email folder periodically. I usually do it once a day. Most of the time the messages in my junk folder are just that—junk. But occasionally, something important winds up in the spam folder. Usually it’s because the sender forgot to include a subject line, or the body… Continue Reading

Privacy Legislation is a Priority for Congress in 2014

Posted in Computer Crimes, Internet & Media Law, Privacy Law
In the wake of the recent Target stores and Neiman Marcus data breaches (plus three other well-known retailers, according to this Reuters report) Congress has 20 privacy bills in the works this year, aimed at consumer privacy and data protection. The Personal Data Privacy & Security Act of 2014 (PDF) introduced by New York Senator Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer), along… Continue Reading

What Does Your Browser History Say About Your Parenting?

Posted in Internet & Media Law, Litigation & Appeals
Most people think about browser history in the context of hiding from your spouse/significant other the fact that you sometimes look at online porn (not that I would know from personal experience), or, perhaps, not letting your kid know that you’ve been reading online reviews about the new bicycle or gadget he’s been hounding you… Continue Reading

“New” Mental Disorders Linked to Internet Use

Posted in Internet & Media Law
  It’s been 20 years since the American Psychiatric Association published a new edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual on Mental Disorders (DSM). Since 1952, psychologists and psychiatrists have been relying on the DSM to consistently and systematically diagnose and classify mental illness and disease. During the six decades since the DSM was first published,… Continue Reading